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JPMorgan Chase & Co.
Jan 18, 2012
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JPMorgan Chase Achieves LEED® Platinum Green Building Certification for Newly Renovated Global Headquarters in New York City

World's largest LEED Platinum renovation to date Will cut electric consumption by 50% and save more than 1 million gallons of water a year

NEW YORK – Jan. 18, 2012 – JPMorgan Chase announced today that it has achieved the highest possible rating, LEED® Platinum, from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) for the renovation of its global headquarters at 270 Park Avenue in Manhattan, making it the world's largest renovation project to achieve Platinum status.

In the United States, existing buildings contribute 50 to 80 percent of urban greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Building Owners and Managers Association. The renovation will allow the 50-story building to cut its electricity consumption in half compared to pre-renovation levels. In addition, the building will save more than 1 million gallons of water a year by installing new, highly efficient systems and an innovative draining and filtering system.

"This was the largest 'green' renovation of a headquarters building in the world, and we completed it while operating in the building," said Frank Bisignano, JPMorgan Chase's Chief Administrative Officer and CEO of Mortgage Banking. "We are extremely proud of the improvements made at 270 Park, which will substantially cut consumption and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Achieving LEED Platinum status is not just a source of pride, it is very sound business."

Earning the Platinum rating meant upgrading and modernizing every system and feature in the 50-year-old building – from heating, air conditioning and lighting, to insulation, plumbing fixtures, flooring and outside views – all while the building remained occupied. To minimize disruptions, an average of 400 construction workers a day completed the renovation in phases, working on up to 10 floors at a time. "With each new LEED-certified building, we get one step closer to USGBC's vision of a sustainable built environment for everyone within a generation," said Rick Fedrizzi, President, CEO and Founding Chair, U.S. Green Building Council. "The work of innovative, forward-thinking building projects such the Park Avenue headquarters of JPMorgan Chase is a fundamental driving force in the green building movement." LEED Platinum certification of JPMorgan Chase's global headquarters was based on a number of green design and construction features, including:
 

 

 

 

 


 

About JPMorgan Chase & Co.

JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM) is a leading global financial services firm with assets of $2.2 trillion and operations in more than 60 countries. The firm is a leader in investment banking, financial services for consumers, small business and commercial banking, financial transaction processing, asset management and private equity. A component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, JPMorgan Chase & Co. serves millions of consumers in the United States and many of the world's most prominent corporate, institutional and government clients under its J.P. Morgan and Chase brands. Information about JPMorgan Chase & Co. is available at www.jpmorganchase.com.

U.S. Green Building Council

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. With a community comprising 79 local affiliates, nearly 16,000 member organizations, and more than 174,000 LEED Professional Credential holders, USGBC is the driving force of an industry that is projected to contribute $554 billion to the U.S. GDP from 2009-2013. USGBC leads an unlikely diverse constituency of builders and environmentalists, corporations and nonprofit organizations, elected officials and concerned citizens, and teachers and students. Visit usgbc.org to learn more.

LEED

The U.S. Green Building Council's LEED green building certification system is the foremost program for the design, construction and operation of green buildings. Over 44,000 projects are currently participating in the LEED rating systems, comprising over 8 billion square feet of construction space in all 50 states and 120 countries.In addition, nearly 15,000 homes have been certified under the LEED for Homes rating system, with more than 65,000 more homes registered. By using less energy, LEED-certified buildings save money for families, businesses and taxpayers; reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and contribute to a healthier environment for residents, workers and the larger community.

For more information, visit www.usgbc.org